NATIONAL PICKLE DAY

NATIONAL PICKLE DAY

National Pickle Day is observed annually on November 14. It may be a Dill, Gherkin, Cornichon, Brined, Kosher Dill, Polish, Hungarian, Lime, Bread and Butter, Swedish and Danish, or Kool-Aid Pickle. Whichever is your choice, eat them all day long.

The term pickle comes from the Dutch word pekel, meaning brine.  In the United States, the word pickle typically refers to a pickled cucumber.

– Each year in the United States, 5,200,000 pounds of pickles are consumed.

– Pickles are a great snack, low in calories and a good source of vitamin K, though they can be high in sodium.

– When served on a stick at festivals, fairs or carnivals, pickles are sometimes known as “stick pickles”.

– A rising trend in the United States is deep-fried pickles which have a breading or batter surrounding the pickle spear or slice.

– For thousands of years, pickles have been a popular food dating back to 2030 B.C.  At that time, cucumbers were imported from India to the Tigris Valley where they were first preserved and eaten as pickles.

– Cleopatra attributed her good looks to her diet of pickles.

– Julius Caesar fed pickles to his troops believing that they lent physical and spiritual strength.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #NationalPickleDay to post on social media.

Educators, visit the National Day Calendar Classroom for project ideas, puzzles and more to use in your classroom.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator of National Pickle Day. The holiday has been celebrated on various days for nearly 70 years, starting with encouragement from the Pickle Packers Association in 1949

 
D. K. Smith

D. K. Smith

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