National Middle Child Day

National Middle Child Day

Each year on August 12th, National Middle Child Day honors that in-between child in the family. Depending on the size of the family, sometimes more than one falls between the firstborn and baby of the family.

Many believe birth order plays a pivotal role in the personalities of children. The Middle Child Syndrome states that the first-born is often the leader and the role-player. Meanwhile, the youngest one earns the title of the baby family. Therefore, the middle child’s role remains undefined.

Birth order is known to contribute to the Big Five personality traits: extroversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience. One personality study claims that middle children tend to be artistic and creative.

No matter what the personality tests and therapists say, the day directs us to focus on the middle child. This day means that parents and siblings pull out all the stops.Make your middle-born family members feel special.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Keep your middle child/children in mind.Try these ideas:

Make their favorite homemade dish and invite them over.

Send a card and share a memory of them. (Be sure the memory is of the middle child and not one of your other children.)

Invite your middle child for coffee.

Call your middle child to find out about their day. This is especially important if you don’t usually call.

Take a walk with your middle child. Throw a frisbee or do one of their favorite activities.

Play a card or board game.

If your middle child has a middle child, suggest all of you make a day of activities together.

Post on social media using National Middle Child Day

Each year on August 12th, National Middle Child Day honors that in-between child in the family. Depending on the size of the family, sometimes more than one falls between the firstborn and baby of the family.

Many believe birth order plays a pivotal role in the personalities of children. The Middle Child Syndrome states that the first-born is often the leader and the role-player. Meanwhile, the youngest one earns the title of the baby family. Therefore, the middle child’s role remains undefined.

Birth order is known to contribute to the Big Five personality traits: extroversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience. One personality study claims that middle children tend to be artistic and creative.

No matter what the personality tests and therapists say, the day directs us to focus on the middle child. This day means that parents and siblings pull out all the stops.Make your middle-born family members feel special.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Keep your middle child/children in mind.Try these ideas:

Make their favorite homemade dish and invite them over.

Send a card and share a memory of them. (Be sure the memory is of the middle child and not one of your other children.)

Invite your middle child for coffee.

Call your middle child to find out about their day. This is especially important if you don’t usually call.

Take a walk with your middle child. Throw a frisbee or do one of their favorite activities.

Play a card or board game.

If your middle child has a middle child, suggest all of you make a day of activities together.

Post on social media using #NationalMiddleChildDay to alert others.

HISTORY

National Middle Children’s Day was created by Elizabeth Walker in the 1980s.It was originally intended to be observed on the second Saturday in August, however, along the way it has become generally accepted to celebrate it on August 12.In a newspaper article submitted by her grandson, Litton Walker, III, Walker stated that she wanted to create a National day to honor those children “born in the middle of families” who she felt were “left out.”The name was later changed to National Middle Child Day. to alert others.

HISTORY

National Middle Children’s Day was created by Elizabeth Walker in the 1980s.It was originally intended to be observed on the second Saturday in August, however, along the way it has become generally accepted to celebrate it on August 12.In a newspaper article submitted by her grandson, Litton Walker, III, Walker stated that she wanted to create a National day to honor those children “born in the middle of families” who she felt were “left out.”The name was later changed to National Middle Child Day.

D. K. Smith

D. K. Smith

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